From Red Wool Blessings to Rubber Plantations

IMG_0924We visited a new temple rather than an ancient one. Bright orange robes of monks and a shiny gold altar sparkled amid the green of the jungle. We gave some money to a monk and in return he tied a thin red wool bracelet to our left wrist, chanting prayers, blowing on the knots he made, we felt blessed with his well wishes. I certainly hoped his prayers would help me as we climbed about one thousands stone steps to the top of Kulen Mountain. Once at the top, we walked beautiful flat trails in the cool jungle. We heard many birds and met one person searching for bees so that he could locate a hive, smoke out the bees and collect the honey which would fetch him $25 per liter. IMG_0951We walked to a small jungle village with scrawny chickens and dusty dogs. Homes are all built on stilts, for the monsoon season, and have a lower platform where people sit or sleep. Upstairs the room has a roof and sleeping space. The “kitchen” is underneath the house or next to it – a simple coal or wood fire with a few pots. Clothes hang on a strong between the posts under the house. As I watch women on their hunches, stirring a pot on a fire, I think back to my kitchen at home. A world away. IMG_0959

We reached the entrance to a National Park and walked along a small river where, 800 years ago, people diverted the water to run from south to north. They paved the river bottom with one thousand ‘linga’s’. A linga is a spiritual symbol: a square carving is a female stone, a round one symbolizes male. IMG_0931

These linga’s, together with a god image and lotus motifs, still decorate the river bottom. Amazing that 800 years of water has not eroded them. The river is thought to be a gift from Buddha and, once you see the river’s source, this is not surprising. It simply comes bubbling out of the earth: a crystal clear spring in a small blue puddle that grows into a powerful river.

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Downstream we saw many people who come out for the Sunday to rent a small wicker platform with a roof. They were all cooking food, having a picnic, playing games and splashing in the river.

Even further down stream we came to 3 enormous, 30 meter high waterfalls. I loved cooling off in the cold water. We are often the only westerners and little children call out “Hello!” waving enthusiastically.

The next day we walked through a rubber plantation. Rubber trees were planted here in long straight row. The trees have about a 4’ section of bark removed with a shallow line which ends in a small bowl catching the rubber, which is collected daily. But the price of rubber has dropped so it isn’t very viable right now.IMG_1057

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