From One Jungle to the Next

IMG_1671Getting off the plane that took us from Phnom Penh to Hong Kong, felt like arriving on a different planet.
Suddenly there were no more stalls with piles of coconuts, pineapples and rambutans. Stores have coolers with sliding glass doors again instead of large orange ice boxes. People wear Gucci’s instead of flip-flops. Instead of power outages, the skyline is alive with neon signs and coloured skyscrapers. 
What is generally all referred to as ‘Hong Kong’ consists of much more than just that city. Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China, and very different from mainland China. No need to apply for a visa ahead of time and much easier to enter. Chinese and English are the official languages of Hong Kong.
Consisting of 1,104 km2 Hong Kong is made up of over 260 islands. The major cities are Hong Kong and Kowloon. Kowloon has a population of just over 2 million, while the entire Administrative Region has about 7.5 million. Most of these people live vertically: in the many skyscrapers that make up HK’s concrete jungle. IMG_1675
We have visited HK several times and explored much of its city and country scapes. On our first day, we walked from one end of Kowloon to the other, following some of its major roads to the water front at Victoria Harbour where we watched the HK skyline, much of it hidden in heavy clouds. You can cut the humidity with a knife. Ferries scuttle back and forth, people from all kinds of cultures walk along the water front. 
Then we walked through Kowloon Park and into an old part of the city, Mong Kok, where stores still are very Chinese. Louis Vuitton and Hermés made way for roast ducks in the windows and piles of red envelops and gold paper to take to the temple.
We were lucky to see the last parts of Chinese New Year, celebrated with music, drumming, dancing and traditional dragon dances. Amazing to see how two men make up one dragon and jump onto high poles while they can barely see anything, yet never missing a pole. IMG_1732
Walking around Kowloon city and going to schools each day, gives us a glimpse into life in this metropolis. It is so crowded. Hordes of people come down the sidewalks, it is sometimes impossible to pass people. Yet almost no one bumps into you. People are friendly and smiling and helpful. Some speak English and can help explain foods in restaurants. I made sure I had addresses in Chinese before taking a taxi. Meals and groceries are so much more expensive than in Cambodia!
Hong Kong is a place of many contrasts. It has skyscrapers and very crowded city streets. But there are also wilderness areas where you can walk and not meet any people. There are monkeys, snakes, even tigers – we were told – in the nearby wilderness. 
On the streets you can see elderly ladies with Chinese wicker hats selling green leaves. But also ultra modern young women in tights and leather boots. Perhaps my favourite contrast is to see a gleaming high rise being build of mirrors and chrome, with bamboo scaffolding… IMG_1759
Getting around the cities is easy. When you arrive at the airport, buy an Octopus card. It works like a credit card and can be used for all trains and busses and even at 7/11. When you leave, they effectively refund the remainder. The MRT goes everywhere and you can transfer to busses. Pretty simple.  But having your destination printed in Chinese is always helpful. For US$12.- per person you can take the Airport Express into Kowloon. We then hopped onto a free shuttle bus that dropped off us at the hotel. We stayed at the Metropark Hotel Kowloon. The location was great. The room was small but clean, good bedding, a small fridge. And the best part was a glorious pool on the rooftop.
If you like shopping and food, Hong Kong is a fun destination. IMG_1752
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2 thoughts on “From One Jungle to the Next

  1. It’s a wonder recount about HK. It’s really a good place for shopping and eating.

    I’m not sure whether travellers over 65 can buy a senior Octopus or not. If yes, then the travelling expenses would be much more cheaper. It will cost only $2 for each single trip.

    Like

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