Pharaohs and Temples

IMG_2643The number of temples, the names of pharaohs, the dates of construction and discoveries – it’s making my head spin. Egypt’s history is beyond anything I’ve seen before. Even if the carvings are similar to those I’ve seen at Angkor Wat or Aztec temples, these Egyptian monuments predate everything. I’ve never before been inside a 4,000 year old building. 

IMG_2992During the cruise on the Nile we visited the temples of Karnak and Luxor. At Karnak, gigantic pillars tower over the visitors. It’s a huge temple complex and we walked around the sphinxes and columns and walls with hieroglyphs. We visited here both in the day time and at night while a light show gave details on the era. It was interesting but I wouldn’t highly recommend the light show. As an archeological site, Karnak was one of the most impressive though.IMG_2668

Luxor, too, had interesting sites. I’m surprised at how different each ancient site is. Some have columns, others just facades. Some have tombs and others are a different kind of monument. In the fabled Valley of the Kings we walked around in the blazing heat and made the trek down into some of the tombs. The long narrow walk way was so low that we had to move bend over. I kept my arms over my head to protect myself from bumping my head on the low stone ceiling. But at the bottom it opened up to a large room which held the sarcophagus. I kept wondering what it would have been like to discover these amazing tombs and their guilded treasures. IMG_2823

Construction of the tomb was started as soon as a pharaoh ascended the throne. If he lived a long life it might get finished but often they had to rush unexpectedly when he died young. The hieroglyphs on the walls leading into and all over the temple, tell the king’s life story and of his heroic deeds. Everything that the king might need in his next life was provided: furniture, tools, food. The spirit had to recognize his body, so the outer sarcophagus was lifelike. The mummified body was inside several different caskets. The whole thing is pretty mind boggling. The model of hidden tombs at Valley of the Kings gives a good idea of the magnitude of the tombs and how secret passageways led all over the place. images

In the Valley of the Kings, pyramids were built as mastaba’s – benches. They are lower mounds of stone. In the period that these were built, pharaohs did not want it knowns where their graves were for fear of grave robbers. Later, the great pyramids of Giza became the iconic symbols for pyramids, including the Djoser Pyramid at Saqqara, built in the 27th century BC.

IMG_2857The temple of Queen Hatshepsut is visible from Karnak. It honestly looks like a huge modern building but dates back to some 1,460 years BC. I believe that all, or almost all temples holding tombs are on the west bank of the Nile. This is because the sun sets in the west and ancient Eqyptians believed that the sun died each night, to be reborn in the east. So the west bank of the Nile is the ‘death’ side and all life took place on the east bank.

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Sunset on the Nile

Tourism is way down in Egypt. Our guide told us that before 2011, long line ups stood outside the tombs in the Valley of the Kings. Now there were some tourists but no line-ups and I was able to take photos without too many people in the way.  As at all major tourist attractions, there are plenty of vendors around. In Egypt bartering is not just a way to get the price down. It is an art form and part of the culture. With the lack of tourists, vendors are pretty desperate and incredibly persistent. They held up cloths and necklaces in our faces, walking along, yelling, sometimes even grabbing our arm. They did not easily take ‘no’ for an answer and it often took the intervention of our guide to get rid of them.

In one area, tour guides were asked not to block the way by speaking to their group in front of the entrance. The English translation of this sign left a bit to be desired… IMG_2869

We do get a chuckle out of many English signs. It’s amazing they don’t get them proof read, especially official signs in official places. There are spelling mistakes in airplanes (a note to “pasangers”), in restaurants (on our menu are “wuffles” and “beanutbutter”) and many other places.

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2 thoughts on “Pharaohs and Temples

  1. This is all so amazing and I’m sure mind-boggling to see in person. I love the lost in translation signs. On a Danube cruise, most of the staff including the captain were Hungarian. Here is the sign we found so amusing.
    PAINT WORK!!!
    NO TRASPAISING!!
    Violators will be shoot!!!
    Surviwors will be shoot again!!!
    The Captain

    We for sure didn’t touch the wet paint. LOL

    Like

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