One Trullo, and it Truly is Two Trulli

IMG_5639Have you ever slept in a wind mill? Or in an igloo or a yurt?

Some types of dwellings are specific to only a small region on earth. When we were researching places to visit in Italy, I came across a photo that blew me away: unusually shaped houses with grey stone, domed roofs. They looked impressive and I studied the websites. But the small region where these traditional homes occurred was in south east Italy, and specifically the town of Alberobello, which was not on our itinerary.

Then an excited young woman, Italian but living in England, contacted me and eventually arranged for my book Stepping Stones to be published in Italian. And it would be launched in Bari while I was still in Italy! And Bari is very close to Alberobello! So….

IMG_5602We took the train east, 4 hours, from Naples. Then a bus, an hour, to Alberobello. The first thing we noticed is how clean other cities were after the garbage strewn streets of Naples. Shiny sidewalks, lovely green parks… And Alberobello exceeded all of my expectations. The historic centre of town has more than 1,000 trulli! Yes, it is a touristy place but the little house are truly historic (no pun intended). To the extent that no new trulli are allowed to be build.

IMG_5603Our ‘hotel room’ is a small trulli in one of the areas with just narrow walkways connecting the homes. Some are used as shops, others as pubs or restaurants. But all are restored, authentic dwellings. And some have not yet been restored. The ‘hotel’ has several trulli around town. For breakfast we walk to a lovely restaurant on the town square with an extensive breakfast bar. We can make tea and coffee in our little house. It has been beautifully restored and I’m impressed with the tasteful decorations: simple stone floors, a wooden ladder holds clothes hangers, a simple wooden table. It all suits the environment of original farm workers homes. 

IMG_5617Around the year 1,400 farm workers in this area needed homes. They simply used the lime stone available, stacking them to build small, rectangular huts with domed roofs. I find it amazing to see the rectangle turn into a round dome. The stones are simply piled on top of each other. Only later did they start using whitewash. While the name ‘trulli’ likely comes from the Greek, archeologists suspect that the origin shapes of the dwellings came from Mesopotamia. 

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Here are some good websites that tell you more about trulli:

Trulli: https://sites.google.com/site/trulliitaliano/unesco-world-heritage

Alberobello: http://www.costadeitrulli.org/en/region/alberobello-55/

Info on trulli: http://www.italia.it/en/discover-italy/apulia/poi/the-history-of-alberobellos-trulli.html

Unesco site: https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/787/

Our hotel: https://www.trulliholiday.com/en/

Trullo symbols: https://trullocicerone.com/2017/06/19/trullo-symbols/

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